60: Stay in School, Kids

by Max Leibman


Toast. Tired. Beat. Exhausted. Under the weather. Over it. 

This week on Priority, Max asks an important question: how do you do your best work when you feel less than your best? What happens to your productivity when you are not firing on all cylinders? With an eight-week-old baby under his roof, it’s little wonder he’s struggling with these very issues right now. 

Caitie—no stranger to wearing multiple plates and keeping a lot of hats spinning—stresses the importance of good self-care. Getting enough (or at least more) rest, eating right, and even minimizing little annoyances all make a difference. 

Whether you’re burning the candle at both ends out of necessity, or just because you like fire, tune in this week for great tips on making the most of your work when you have the least to offer! 

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59: Citing a Manhole Cover

by Max Leibman


How would you rate your memory? 

If you said better than average, try this: can you recall that story Max told during our last episode—about the mommy blogger who made a reader so mad that they reported the blogger to Child Protective Services? 

If you find yourself nodding along, check your memory—that story got cut before you heard the episode!  You are in good company, though. Max did the same thing when he recounted it without checking his sources (as it turns out, the incident never happened). 

The week on Priority, Caitie and Max explore memory, and its many failings. Our memories trick us, degrade, vanish, and sometimes spontaneously form from whole cloth. The only way out is a paradox: every strategy to improve our recall, from calendars to journals to photographs, involves not relying on memory itself. 

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58: Dad Eyes

by Max Leibman


Max is a new dad! Caitie is a new aunt! Priority has a new episode!

One month ago, Max and Kourtney welcomed their son, Owen, into the world. Thanks to the experience of becoming a parent, Max now understands things about life and love that only another parent can appreciate. 

Kidding: this is not that kind of show. Max is actually pretty down on that kind of parental self-importance, but he does now understand a few things better than he did before. He’s rapidly becoming an expert on sleep deprivation, time constraints, and dirty diapers. 

This week on Priority, Caitie picks her co-host’s brain about life and work in a post-baby world, and tries to tackle some very real issues: what happens to work in the face of a newborn? How did he brace for change? And just how do you pronounce “aunt?” 

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57: The Gravel Road of the Information Superhighway

by Max Leibman


Do you feel like you've been literally buried alive in business metaphors? Just missed your black belt in martial arts-inspired jargon? In the second half of their review of The 5 Choices: The Path to Extraordinary Productivity, Max and Caitie explore the book's sage advice for managing schedules, technology, and energy.
 
Caitie critiques the authors' varied imagery—the "gravel" of trivial tasks and notifications, or the Samurai-like "swordlessness" of one who avoids dependence on a particular tool. Max places The 5 Choices into its historical context, and suggests that the book even works as "GTD Light" for those who find David Allen's Getting Things Done overwhelming. 
 
The book’s sleazy antagonist, Carl, returns in these latter pages, too. The authors promise that their advice can handle him, but the Priority hosts don’t believe in leaving things to chance. Their takeaway? Carl must be stopped, at any cost.

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56: A [Math] Number of Goals

by Max Leibman


This week, the Priority team presents the first half of its review of The 5 Choices: The Path to Extraordinary Productivity.

Caitie takes issue with the books’ hypothetical antagonist, Carl the office creep. Max feels slightly skeptical when authors Kory Kogon, Adam Merrill, and Leena Rinne claim this book isn’t about managing time. Worse, he picks a fight with the entire Internet over the productivity legacy of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Still, our hosts can get behind The 5 Choices' actual focus: managing decisions, attention, and energy. And Caitie definitely appreciates the book's realistic standards: “extraordinary” goals, for instance, are a personal benchmark, not someone else's ideal. 

Will Carl finally be sent to the HR class on hostile work environments? Will Ike bomb Max back to the Stone Age? There are only five ways to find out...

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